MORE Slang I grew up on…..

1970s

(Photo credit http://bit.ly/1qIKLtb)

Sorry there is another trip down memory lane for me and all the other oldies reading this blog…I have to mention these other slang phrases that I grew up on in New Zealand – 14,000 miles away from England, and yet somehow we still use them! English is a strange thing.

Bob’s your uncle –  means that’s the end of that, and everything ended well.

Botch – To make a botch or something means to make a mess of something. Not do it well.

Brassed off – If you are brassed off with something or someone, you are fed up and annoyed.

Butcher – If you butcher something it has a similar meaning to ‘botch’, to make a mess of something.

Easy Peasy – A children’s term meaning easy.

Full of beans – to be full of beans means to be full of energy.

Give us a bell – means ‘call me on the phone’.

I’m easy – means I don’t mind.

Lurgy – if you have a ‘lurgy’ it means that you are not well and have caught some virus that is going around.

Not my cup of tea – means it’s not something that I personally enjoy or like.

Off colour – means that you don’t feel very well, but okay to work.

Off your trolley – means you are crazy.

Posh – if something is posh it is very expensive and only rich people will have one.

Shambles – if something is a shambles it is untidy and nor organised at all.

Spend a penny – If you want to ‘spend a penny’ it means you need to go to the toilet.

Swotting – if someone is swotting they are studying very hard for an exam.

Taking the mickey – if someone is ‘taking the mickey’ they are joking with someone about something and that person doesn’t know it and perhaps misunderstands you, so you have to tell them, it’s okay, I am just ‘taking the mickey’.

Throw a spanner in the works – if you throw a spanner in the works it means that you have either purposely or not purposely made a problem for something that has been well organised.

Wonky – if something is wonky it means it is not straight. The picture on the wall is wonky, let’s straighten it.

Yonks – simply means a long time. I haven’t seen you for yonks!

Yes as mentioned all these phrases are used in England a lot…and New Zealand and Australia, but not in other colonies, interesting. Anyone know why? Let me know…

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